Equestrian Blog

News and thoughts from around the equestrian community

FAQs on riding hats after 1384 withdrawal

Why has the 1384 standard been withdrawn? Safety standards, including 1384, are typically revised every 5 years, but not every revision results in significant changes. The review process for 1384 was underway for some years, but a deemed lack of progress towards consensus on whether the standard should be changed has led to the unfortunate situation where the standard has instead been withdrawn, completely. [More]

Free Delivery - Limited Time Only!

Yippee! From Monday 9th November our standard UK mainland delivery service – up to £5.99 – will be FREE for online orders and there's no minimum spend required! As an added bonus, we’ll even deduct £5.99 from the delivery charge should your order require our Express, Export, Offshore or Heavy Duty service. Which means you’ll be saving whatever delivery service you use! [More]

Extended Christmas Returns

We’re making Christmas shopping even easier…anything purchased either online, via our mail order service, or from one of our stores, between 1st Nov & 31st Dec can be returned up until 31st January. So you can shop now and return any unwanted/duplicate items fuss-free throughout January. Goods purchased online or via our mail order service can be returned to us by posting the unwanted items to: Robinsons Country Leisure P.O Box 511 Wigan WN1 9AE Please be aware that if there was no error on our part, we will only refund you the cost of the item(s) and not the postage charge. Alternatively, you can take your goods to any of our retail stores, but you need to take along your delivery note as well, as proof of original purchase. Goods purchased from any of our stores, need to be returned to the same store, along with the original receipt, in order for us to process either a refund or an exchange. To view our full returns policy, please click here. If you have any queries about returning your Robinsons Christmas purchases, please call our Customer Services Team on 0844 573 1001. Happy shopping!  

Guide To Jodhpur Boots!

There are many different types of horse riding boots on the market and jodhpur boots are amongst the most popular. Jodhpur boots were originally designed to be worn with jodhpurs and are ankle length which makes them easy to pull on and off, as well as offering a greater degree of flexibility than long riding boots. They were originally worn with a strap fitting around the back of the boot and securely fastened in place with a buckle at the side. This traditional style is still popular with riders today, but there are plenty of alternatives available, depending on personal choice. Jod boots with safety caps are very practical around horses! Boots that are laced up the front are generally known as paddock boots, some boots have front zip fastenings while others have zipped located at the rear. The most popular styles are those that feature elasticated sides, which make them easier to get on and off…particularly useful for younger riders. These boots are extremely versatile and you’ll find they look just as good with jeans when you’re out and about in town!Choosing Your Jodhpur Boots When it comes to shopping for jod boots it’s important you take your time and make the right decision on the boots best suited to your circumstances and style of riding. Safety around horses is always key, which is why many opt for a pair of boots that are fitted with reinforced steel toe caps, designed to help keep toes protected should your horse stand on your foot. Then there are everyday boots that can be made from either leather or more usually a synthetic leather. These are great if you need one pair of boots that you can wear to do jobs around the yard and ride in as they tend to be a little more durable and easier to clean. Top of the range boots can feature extras such as waterproof membranes, padded ankles, Thinsulate linings, full grain leather uppers and dozens of technological advancements all aimed to optimise wearer fit and comfort.  

Spring Is Here!

Yippee…the clocks went forwards yesterday, which means lots of lighter evenings. Great news for horse owners, as it means we can actually see our horses in the day light, something which has become a distant memory in the last few months!   Hairy Beasts Horses everywhere are starting to shed their winter coats and at the end of a good grooming session most horse owners come out of the stable hairier than their horse. For those with clipped out horses the task in hand isn’t quite as bad, although the inside of their rugs will probably see a build-up of hair, which will need brushing off before you even think about washing them!   It’s Nearly Show Time The show season is due to start soon, so if you haven’t already made a start, now is an excellent time to start getting your horse fit and the pair of you ready to show the world what you’re made of. It’s a great idea to book some lessons to get you both focused and prepared for a busy season…it’s true that practice does make perfect! Don’t forget that if your show jacket is looking a little shabby, or your jodhpurs aren’t quite as comfortable as they used to be…we’ve plenty of new ones to choose from at prices to suit all budgets.     Paddock Maintenance Paddock maintenance will have undoubtedly slipped during the dark, cold and wet winter months. Now’s the time to make the most of the lighter evenings by poo picking, fence mending, harrowing, reseeding and rolling. Do you need some extra electric fencing so you can strip graze your paddock once the grass starts to appear? Now’s also a good time for picking up any litter that’s blown into the field and generally making it as safe as possible for your horse.   Stable Spring Clean? A glimpse of the sunshine might just inspire you to give your stable a bit of a spring clean. Pick a sunny day to get rid of the cobwebs and disinfect your stable so that it can air and dry out before your horse comes back in from the field. This will reduce dust in the stable helping to keep your horse’s respiratory system clear and healthy. It’s also a good time to get your winter horse rugs washed, dried and stored safely away ready for next winter.   ‘Feel Good’ Time! Like many outdoorsy people, I’ve been literally counting down the days to when the weather turns warmer, the evenings get lighter, the grass begins to grow in the horse field and my horse can go out naked…without a rug on. For most horse owners, this is payback for getting through a pretty dismal winter dealing with lots of mud, high winds and wet rugs. Here’s to lots of lovely, long evening hacks after work and good luck to anyone who's about to start the show season!  

Top Tackroom Essentials

Owning a horse is a way of life in which you never stop learning from your experiences but whatever stage you're at, you'll always need to rely on a number of fundamental items in the tack room. Tackroom essentials range from riding equipment, bits and pieces for proper maintenance and, of course, healthcare accessories. Here we present a list of necessary products that help make your tack room a comfortable and practical space. Saddlery and bridlework Saddles differ enormously depending on the type of riding you intend to do but you're bound to need a selection in your tack room. General purpose saddles are the most common but you can get hold of saddles designed for jumping, endurance riding, dressage and so on. Store your saddles neatly on saddle racks to keep the tack room properly organised and to protect your investment - saddles are expensive bits of kit and constantly leaning them against a variety of surfaces does them no good, so it makes sense to store them safely. The same goes for the leathers, stirrups, bits, straps and all the things that make up the rest of your bridlework.  Devoting wall space to hooks and hangers is a good idea because it's important to have a system in the tack room, otherwise your oasis of equestrian calm may quickly descend into chaos. First aid materials and grooming Accidents and injuries are an ever-present risk while riding so your tack room ought to be well-stocked with first aid materials. Your first aid provision should be two-fold: it should cater for injuries to you and to your horse. Coat care, skin care, hoof care, fly control, mane and tail care – these are all priorities and you'll need kits for all of them. Good horse care often starts with good grooming, so you'll need storage space for grooming kits as well. An extra first aid supply for the cuts and scrapes you may sustain yourself is good practice. Keep that accessible and topped up with the right kit. Practical accessories A good tackroom (and yard) should also boast a range of practical accessories that enable you to take care of the more prosaic side of horse ownership. Feeding and mucking out are everyday tasks that are physically demanding but enjoyable nonetheless. Wheelbarrows, forks and shovels come in various shapes and sizes – these too ought to be kept in convenient racks. Your tackroom is your horse's wardrobe, tool shed, kitchen, medicine cabinet and bathroom cupboard all in one.  With so many necessary items to store (and to access quickly, if needed), isn't it worth spending time making sure yours is as tidy and as organised as it can be?